Tuesday, 16 May 2017

Cardinality "Under Construction"

My inquiry topic to help move children from stage one to stage two is still "under construction".   As with building real buildings gaining knowledge for some requires an ordered process of laying down one brick at a time and not just pouring a large slab of concrete and seeing a building suddenly appear.

 I am building up the number knowledge and number sense of those who have not yet fully grasped the idea of cardinality and therefore can not move on to addition and subtraction.  Some children have moved from rote counting "onetwothreefourfivesix..." to assigning a value to the words and connecting one word to one object.  Others are working on counting the number in a set only once and I have found putting these sets into a regular pattern or order helps these children.  Irregular or scattered patterns leads to double counting.  Another block some children still need to overcome, is that a number is always the same no matter where it is or the size or colour of the objects.

We continue to practice and enjoy maths even though progress it is at a slower pace for some.


 

Sunday, 2 April 2017

Growing Number Knowledge

Over the past six weeks, I have been using activities to strengthening and develop the children's number knowledge and strategies to provide a good foundation for the development at further stages. I have focussed on number identification so that they are able to read, sequence, rote count and record the numbers 1 to 10.  And the second focus has been on forwards and backwards number sequences.  Both areas are part of the number framework.

I am using a wide range of activities such as playing games, going on a number hunt and taking photos of groups of objects and putting them in order, iPad activities, puzzles, dot to dot, choral chanting or rote counting, poems and taking any opportunities during the day to count and record numbers.

The early number activities were done with concrete objects so the children could physically manipulate the objects as they counted.  This reduced the task of learning to count to an enjoyable activity where the manipulative objects were used as "thinking tools".  For example the Cliposaurus activity reduces the amount of recording for children but still required the reading of numbers.

Children manipulating cut up numbered pictures


The children enjoy choral chanting and clapping as a maths warm up so most are able to correctly say the number sequence to ten.  Some children are still struggling with written recording so this is still a part of our daily practise.

Physical activities are enjoyed by the children where they pretend they are a given number and need to line up by finding the number that goes before them and checking who comes after them.  This physical moving is helping them with the concepts of before and after which they are finding tricky.

I have found that games provide a fun way to practice their number knowledge that meet a specific mathematical purpose.  The children learn to explain and justify simple concepts such as in the game "What is the Missing Number?" by justifying what comes before or after or by checking against a number line.

The children need to become proficient "doers and learners" to make sense of numbers and help them think for themselves.




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Tuesday, 21 February 2017

Moving On - Maths Inquiry 2017

Our school wide Inquiry this year is focused on mathematics. Research results have shown we are achieving acceleration in reading and writing but it is time to turn our attention to maths to see if we can also achieve more acceleration in this area.

As I am a teacher of Year one children just beginning their mathematical journey it is important for the children to develop a sound number knowledge and strategies.

My inquiry will centre on a group of children who find difficulty in moving from stage 1 (counting one to one) to stage 2 (combining sets - adding and subtracting).  They can count and form sets of objects up to ten but they are unable to solve simple problems that involve joining and separating sets like 3 + 2. They can count the 3 counters in one hand and the two counters in the other but when asked how many they have all together they say "three two".

This raises questions such as what strategies can I use to help these children?  How can I strengthen these children's understanding? What key items of knowledge do the children need to developed? What learning activities can I select and implement that will aid these children?  Would using manipulative equipment be more useful than iPad activities?

The beginning of this journey will involve an in depth look at reviewing their present knowledge to see what number knowledge they have and then working on activities to strengthen their understanding within the stage. This information, along with current literature and colleague's advice, will help me formulate an action plan for my teaching inquiry.

Monday, 13 February 2017

New Beginnings in a New Year - 2017.

It is the beginning of a new year with a group of 17 year one students.  I am delighted to be teaching year one students again and to be taking the first steps in their learning voyage with them.

The focus this year is that "we are voyagers."  It is fitting to think about navigating through our learning journey.  We need to know who we are, where we come from and where we are going to.

Most of the children in Room 16 this year have previously spent a few weeks at school at the end of last year so they have a sense of belonging to Point England already.  They are enthusiastic to get on with their learning voyage again.  We have been getting into new routines and getting to know each other.

We look forward to sharing some of our adventures through our class blog.

Monday, 7 November 2016

Successes Shared and Advice Sought

Collaborative inquiry groups are an informal way of sharing success and seeking advise from colleagues outside our team.

I shared the small success I have had in helping a child to use what he does know and to encourage him to recognise what he needs to know and remember.  We have moved from looking at a letter to remembering the shape or sequence of two or three letters.  He is seeing and commenting on words around the room or in books we read and he is so positive about his learning.  Each learning journey starts with small steps!

The advice I sought was in helping children transfer their oral vocabulary into their writing.  A good suggestion was to get the children to record their story so they could listen to what they originally said and write it down. The replay idea would also help children hear words and visualise what sounds they need to write as so often they don't use a word because they don't know how to spell it.